Thursday, January 01, 2015

Had a Few Classes Since My Last Post

Friday night there was an open mat night.  We pretty much just did line techniques for the class.  Chris picked many of them.  Then after a while Mr. Mulligan came over to keep an eye on us.  At one point he asked us to take turns coming up with different kokyunage.  After a while you have difficulty coming up with variations on this.

One of the techniques I did we used to practice quite a bit at the other dojo.  It's more like kaitenage then kokyunage but I slipped it in there anyway.  I was curious if Mr. Mulligan had a comment or take on it.  He didn't say too much about it.  Actually the first person to attack me was Tony.  He came in pretty fast with a punch to my face.  I reacted quick enough to redirect the punch and do the technique.

Chris commented that he thought an atemi was important before the technique.  After a little discussion I found out that he and maybe two other of our senior students are big fans of Serge's Monday night class.  They are convinced that the most effective way to do aikido is Serge's way.

Serge's version of aikido is more about putting uke in a position where he has no choice but to comply or his joint breaks.  To an untrained person however, this means that they have no idea which way to go to relieve the pressure.  Most likely the natural reaction would be to stand there in pain.  Either totally still, collapse at the knees, or fighting/struggling as they don't know what else to do.  Nage is safe but at best may have uke struggle and injure himself.  This flavor of aikido isn't taught by anyone else at the dojo.  I'm curious to see what happens to the dojo as a whole when these 3 high ranking students actually start teaching.

This isn't the flavor of aikido I like.  I'd rather that I unbalance uke and they find themselves on the ground not knowing how they got there.  There are ways to do techniques where uke doesn't feel anything so they don't try to struggle or fight.  That's not the case with everything of course but I prefer this thought while training.  In fact, I'd rather start a technique and if it fails because uke responds, have me move on to a different technique.  This to me is a better result than forcing something to happen.

2 Comments:

At January 02, 2015 8:48 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

You're right E. To have Uke standing there struggling is bad for two reasons.
1 - while he's struggling, he may find a way to struggle out of whatever you're doing to him.
2 - while you're struggling to hold him, his buddy is sneaking up behind you.
"Throw and Go" is the way to do it.
Jim.

 
At January 02, 2015 8:48 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

You're right E. To have Uke standing there struggling is bad for two reasons.
1 - while he's struggling, he may find a way to struggle out of whatever you're doing to him.
2 - while you're struggling to hold him, his buddy is sneaking up behind you.
"Throw and Go" is the way to do it.
Jim.

 

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